...

Understanding the Role of Texas Child Protective Services in Custody Cases

Texas Child Protective Services Frequently Asked Questions

Can CPS terminate parental rights in Texas?

While CPS (Child Protective Services) in Texas cannot directly terminate parental rights, they can file a lawsuit requesting the termination of parental rights if they believe it is in the best interest of the child. Ultimately, it’s up to a judge to decide whether to terminate parental rights based on the evidence presented in court.

What authority does CPS have in Texas?

In Texas, CPS has the authority to investigate reports of child abuse and neglect, provide support services to families, and recommend protective measures for children in danger. CPS can also remove children from their homes if there’s an immediate threat to their safety and can place them in foster care or with relatives. Additionally, CPS can file a lawsuit to request the termination of parental rights in extreme cases.

Do you have to cooperate with CPS Texas?

While it’s generally advisable to cooperate with CPS, you’re not legally required to do so in Texas. However, refusing to cooperate may lead to further investigation or legal action. If you’re concerned about your rights or the consequences of not cooperating with CPS, it’s recommended that you consult with an attorney who specializes in child protective services cases.

Which of the following is a responsibility of Child Protective Services?

Child Protective Services (CPS) is responsible for:

  • Investigating reports of child abuse and neglect.
  • Providing support services to families in need.
  • Removing children from their homes if there’s an immediate threat to their safety.
  • Placing children in foster care or with relatives when necessary.
  • Recommending or filing lawsuits to terminate parental rights in extreme cases.
Categories: CPS

Share this article

Category

Categories

Contact Law Office of Bryan Fagan, PLLC Today!

At the Law Office of Bryan Fagan, PLLC, the firm wants to get to know your case before they commit to work with you. They offer all potential clients a no-obligation, free consultation where you can discuss your case under the client-attorney privilege. This means that everything you say will be kept private and the firm will respectfully advise you at no charge. You can learn more about Texas divorce law and get a good idea of how you want to proceed with your case.

Plan Your Visit

Office Hours

Mon-Fri: 8 AM – 6 PM Saturday: By Appointment Only

"(Required)" indicates required fields