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A Short Evolution of Divorce Things are Getting Better

In 1986 a Mom and Dad were taking the final steps in their divorce. A small business owner and a stay-at-home mom were finishing a years-long battle over the kids, the business, and their assets.

Mom and Dad were college sweethearts, married just after graduation before moving back to Dad’s small hometown so he could take over his family business. They had two young sons who were distraught over the never-ending conflict between their parents and afraid that Mom was going to move them back to her home city, hundreds of miles away from the only home they’d ever known.

Divorce Could Be One Sided

Tired of the constant battle and exhausted from the uncertainty, Mom and Dad had finally reached a settlement. To an outsider, it seemed horrifyingly unbalanced. To Dad, it seemed like the only way to get this divorce over with so he could move on, and to Mom it still didn’t seem to compensate for the family she lost.

Mom gets the two boys, indefinite alimony, the proceeds from the sale of the family home, a huge chunk of Dad’s family corporation (as well as a lump sum payment from the company annually). Dad gets the occasional visits with his sons from a distant city, no holidays with his boys, and is left with a conflict-free but empty life, other than his family business.

In 1986, that was the reality of divorce. After a two-year battle, one parent could be left totally empty while the other seemingly came away with it all, still not feeling like it was enough. Never ending alimony combined with totally unbalanced parenting for no reason other than Mom was bitter over the divorce and wanted her kids to herself. In 2016, however, things have changed drastically.

Things Are Better in Family Law Courts

Divorce is still a painful and emotional process. It still leaves both parents feeling like they have less than they had before after compromising on the kids, the money, and the house. Nobody leaves a divorce happy, that was true in 1986 and its true today. However, today, attorneys and judges fight to make divorces as painless as possible for everyone involved. While it is still a long process, it doesn’t have to take years and it doesn’t have to feel like a “winner-take-all” situation.

When determining custody of children mother's no longer always win. The new standard for determining child custody is "Best Interest of the Children." When the Court is determining property issues the standard is a "Just and Right Division of the property."

Both parents today usually have the ability to be involved in their children’s lives. Family courts make it a priority to ensure that kids aren’t losing a parent when a divorce happens, and that they are still allowed a meaningful relationship with both Mom and Dad as much as possible.

An attorney in 2016 knows exactly what a court will usually do in a divorce case. Because of that, an attorney can effectively fight for your right to have a relationship with your kids, to keep your family business intact, to prevent you from paying unnecessary alimony or spousal support, and to keep you from losing as much as possible. Even if you settle your divorce, an attorney can use a court’s guidelines to ensure that you don’t get left with nothing.

Most people do not feel like they win in a divorce, but today, Family Law Courts are more balanced in divorce then they used to be.  

Law Office of Bryan Fagan | Spring, Texas Divorce Lawyers

The Law Office of Bryan Fagan routinely handles matters that affect children and families. If you have questions regarding divorce, it's important to speak with one of our Spring, TX Divorce Lawyers right away to protect your rights.

Our divorce lawyers in Spring TX are skilled at listening to your goals during this trying process and developing a strategy to meet those goals. Contact Law Office of Bryan Fagan by calling (281) 810-9760 or submit your contact information in our online form. The Law Office of Bryan Fagan handles Divorce cases in Spring, Texas, Cypress, Klein, Humble, Kingwood, Tomball, The Woodlands, the FM 1960 area, or surrounding areas, including Harris County, Montgomery County, Liberty County, Chambers County, Galveston County, Brazoria County, Fort Bend County and Waller County.

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  • Frequently Asked Questions

    Our blog features a wealth of knowledge pertaining to some of the most frequently asked family law questions.

    Read More
  • Sign Up For Our Free E-Course

    Click here to sign up for our free E-Course on Divorce! It has been specifically created to help people who are considering divorce and wish to learn more about the divorce process

    Sign Up Now
  • Schedule Your Free Consultation Now

    Schedule a risk-free consultation today and we can assess your case.

    Book Now
  • Meet With a Finance Specialist

    Discuss payment plan options and more with a finance specialist.

    Get Started Now

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Law Office of Bryan Fagan
Spring Divorce Attorney
Located at: 17101 Kuykendahl Rd,
Houston, TX 77068
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Phone: (281) 810-9760
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